H. Maynard Blumer / H. Maynard Blumer / H. Maynaard Blumer, FAIA, FCSI, Consulting Architect (Ret) / BS ASU 1976 : B of Arch, OSU 1953 / 03.20.18

Where is design going?

Out of the pencil – into the computer, and down the drain.

How can design education be more relevant?

Better career testing and advising in high schools. Design education can not be defined at university level, but its aptitude may be discovered at anytime.

What are the future skillsets designers need to learn now?

Career specific on developing tools, while being very wide on creative analytical thinking.

What should a design school do to prepare students for transdisciplinary work?

This may be a mistake. One must know the principles of related fields but do not get too far into the details. There just is not enough time in a life time.

What should a design school do to forward equity and inclusion?

If a student must, then let them try, but advise them when to switch from dreams to reality of natural aptitudes.

What other thoughts/ideas would you like to share?

Broad foundations are good, But college is for honing not for discovery of born aptitudes.

H. Maynard Blumer

H. Maynard Blumer

H. Maynaard Blumer, FAIA, FCSI, Consulting Architect (Ret)

BS ASU 1976 : B of Arch, OSU 1953

Join the Conversation

One comment on “H. Maynard Blumer

  1. Hi Maynard! Wow, so great to bump into you here at the ReDesign discussion!

    “But college is for honing, not for discovery of born aptitudes.”

    I’m going to have to respectfully disagree with you here. There are not enough arts and design programs currently in place, at least here in the underperforming Arizona public schools, to assume that students have had a chance to discover their aptitude. Design takes a backburner to arts and arts takes a backburner to nearly everything.

    Having taught in higher education in Arizona for 18 years, I can say that the students coming in today are drastically different than those coming in 15 years ago, through no fault of their own. The differences are societal and also systemically institutional.

    I will also insist that great designers of this generation are typically made, not born. Some may be born with an innate talent for spatial intelligence but others may not discover it or be given the opportunity to develop it until much later in their lifetimes. This is also no fault of their own.

    I agree with you that better career testing and advising in high schools would be good. I remember taking aptitude testing for spacial intelligence in middle school in Industrial Arts class (aka Shop) some 30 years ago but am not sure what’s being done now.

    Until we next meet, my friend!

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *